Nance Vallieres started the discussion on a facebook page called "I was born in Lewiston, Maine, and remember when...":

Did your mother ever “invent” a dessert out of food that was laying around the house? I remember my mother would take a piece of bread and put it in a bowl then put cling peaches w/ juice over it. She also gave us a piece of bread and a small bowl of molasses and we would dunk our bread in it for a “sweet treat” (I still do this). :)

The prompt was answered by over a hundred Mainers recalling the incredibly creative edible inventions their parents passed off as dessert. Some sound pretty good, while others... well, let's just say I'd skip dessert that day. Have you ever tried any of these when you're desperate for something sweet but you can't make it to the store?

 

Some recipes had french names attached to them:

"Miton": A piece of bread with milk poured over it and sugar sprinkled on top

"Scarabut": Maple syrup and peanut butter on bread

"Trampette": A piece of bread dipped in molasses or maple syrup and cream

"La Tire": Snow topped with maple syrup

 

Some other inventions had no names but were similarly creative with household items:

Saltines in a bowl of milk with sugar on top

Lettuce with sugar sprinkled over

Bread dipped in a mixture of sour cream, strawberry jam, and milk

Bread smothered in strawberry preserves with evaporated milk (Carnation in a can), dubbed by the facebook poster as "poor man's strawberry shortcake"

Toast topped with sour cream and brown sugar

Buttered bread with ketchup

Banana slices with milk and cinnamon sugar

Graham crackers in milk

White bread topped with sour cream and brown sugar

Cheese slices in molasses (like, what?? seriously?! "Come get your cheese molasses treat, kids!")

 

And finally for the closest thing to a real recipe (but still made from household items):

Cornflakes and peanut butter rolled into balls, topped with a frosting made from cocoa powder and sugar water, all frozen.

Boy, parents sure can be creative... and cheap as hell.