Flume Gorge

Franconia Notch, New Hampshire

No one told us that Gorge is actually short for gorgeous. Flume Gorge in New Hampshire is located at the base of Mount Liberty and it is among the most spectacular sights in the mountainous forests of the Granite State.

According to the New Hampshire Division of Parks and Recreation, Flume Gorge was discovered in 1808 by a 93-year old woman named Aunt Jess Guernsey.

She had trouble convincing her family of the marvelous discovery, but eventually persuaded others to come and see for themselves.

Today, you can navigate the high Conway granite walls and rushing waterfalls on the wood boardwalks.

One of the most incredible features of the gorge are the nearly 90-foot tall granite walls. These walls were formed long before Aunt Jess Guernsey discovered the beautiful area. In fact, they were formed nearly 200 millions years ago. During the Jurassic Times, it was deeply buried in molten rock. Years of cooling, erosion, and basalt rising to the surface lead to the tall granite walls on either side of Flume Brook.

According to the New Hampshire Division of Parks & Recreation, there was one special feature present the day Aunt Jess Guernsey that has never been found today.

At that time, a huge egg-shaped boulder hung suspended between the walls...A heavy rainstorm in June of 1883 started a landslide that swept the boulder from its place. It has never been found. The same storm deepened the gorge and formed Avalanche Falls.


Flume Gorge is open between May 6 and October 23 for an entry fee that helps maintain the area.