I thought unbuttoning my jeans after Thanksgiving made me feel fluffy but now I’m feeling pretty lazy compared to what Kendrew VanGorder has been up to.

The Mount Desert High School alum recently went on a solo bicycle ride from Seattle to Bar Harbor where he ended his trip summiting Cadillac Mountain.

The Mount Desert Islander shared his story to either make us feel inadequate, motivated, or perhaps both.

Across the Northernmost states, VanGorder biked 4,200 miles with four bags strapped to his bike with everything he needed for the road. He shared with the Islander that the trip was easier than hiking because he was able to ride through towns with places to sleep, grocery stores to replenish his supplies, humans to interact with, and the option to shower.

There is actually a specific bike route that goes from Seattle directly to Bar Harbor and wanting to finish at his home base is what inspired this Adventure Cycling Association (ACA) Northern Tier route. The cyclist is from Mount Desert Island and biking back to his homebase gave him an added push and goal.

Google Maps
loading...

So, how did he do it?

He stayed mostly on public roads with fairly low traffic with four bags filled with camping gear, clothing, and supplies that he stocked up on every three to four days, according to the article. He shared that once he got to the halfway point in the Midwest, he needed to take a little break.

I would have needed a break while I was still in Seattle.

The journey commenced on August 8 and VanGorder summited Cadillac Mountain on October 24, making the trip in a little less than 3 months. The cutest part of the story, in my opinion, is that this was actually his first time ever riding his bike up Cadillac, even as a Mount Desert cyclist.

That must have been one hell of a triumphant feeling.

What do you think he did the next day? Sleep? Relax? Watch a movie?

He went hiking.

Gosh, I feel lazy.

LOOK: Route 66’s quirkiest and most wonderful attractions state by state

Stacker compiled a list of 50 attractions--state by state--to see along the drive, drawing on information from historic sites, news stories, Roadside America, and the National Park Service. Keep reading to discover where travelers can get their kicks on Route 66.