School is starting and for most parents facing a mix of in-school and remote learning, it's a scheduling nightmare.

The Sun Journal reported on the growing trend in the country right now of pandemic pods or pod learning.

It's where you get a teacher, privately, to teach a small group of kids on a consistent basis. Some parents are doing this to supplement the days of remote learning in a mixed schedule.

Many schools are doing some in school learning and some at home remote learning. That can be tough to schedule around.

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There are, of course, pros and cons to pandemic pods. The pros are that your kids get a consistent learning environment with socializing. Parents have the time to work their jobs without the worry that they have to stay home a couple times a week to supervise remote learning and help their kids.

But the giant con is that it's expensive and many families don't have the resources for this type of additional learning. Some say pods will contribute to the growing opportunity gaps the coronavirus has exacerbated. Many teachers encourage that if you are going to get a pod together to make it is as diverse as your community. Most think this won't happen.

Either way, childcare is in critical need for families no matter what their socioeconomic status.

There are still so many unknowns in the upcoming school year. What happens if schools are forced to go to all remote learning? Will everyone be scrambling again to make sure their kids get the best education they can...and have childcare?

Most parents are searching for answers and resources. Maine is trying its best to support schools and parents - but no one really knows what his school year will bring until we are in it.