Do you know the story of Colonel Buck?

This is freaky, and of course, let's you know that creepy guys have existed for centuries! According to Wikipedia and Only in Your State, this Colonel Buck was a super loser. There are a couple of versions of what happened - but the end result is still the same!

Let's focus first on the positives of Colonel Jonathan Buck.

He was born in Massachusetts, but moved to Maine and founded Bucksport back in the 1700s, according to an article on bucksport.gov. It was then known as Plantation 1.

He also built the first sawmill and opened up the first general store, according to the Bangor Daily News.

That's the good news. Now for the bad news.

Bruce C. Cooper (Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike)

Colonel Buck was a justice of the peace, and one version of the legend has it that he ordered a witch put to death by burning, and this witch put a curse on his tomb, according to the bucksport.gov article. The other story is that he fathered a child with a woman NOT his wife, the article noted, and to get out of taking responsibility, he ordered that woman burned at the stake, and she cursed him.

The curse? The mark of the burned witch/wife's leg and foot that appears on his tombstone.

Okay, that could just be a mark that just happens to look like a leg. But (and here's where goosebumps happen) - no matter how many times the image on the tombstone has been removed - the mark reappears!!

The bucksport.gov article states: "Over the years, people knowledgeable about monuments have explained that the image is the result of a natural flaw in the stone, perhaps a vein of iron which darkens through contact with oxygen."

Or is it...

I couldn't find a record of how many times the image on the tombstone has been removed - but even if it's only once...the fact that the leg outline keeps appearing let's me know that Colonel Buck is not resting comfortably.

Photo details: Bruce C. Cooper (Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike: No Changes Made)

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