Remember riding bikes around your neighborhood as a kid? I’ll never forget when my parents decided I was old enough and ready to ride my bike to a friend’s house alone. I felt like a fully cooked adult! Independence never tasted so sweet! Plus you never forget your first bike!  Mine was a baby blue “Huffy” with pink and silver streamers and of course a basket on the front for snacks. I felt SHARP rolling up in that thing. 

According to turnto10.com, 16-year-old  Christopher Clyne from Rhode Island had a similar childhood. Some of his fondest memories involved riding his bike. The idea that not all families can afford bikes for their kids was not sitting well with Chris. He decided to do something about it! 

The article states that the 16-year-old put out a call for donations of unwanted bikes and just like that, they started rolling in! Oh, the power of social media! However, many of them needed repairs that he didn't know how to do. He reached out to a dude named Donny Green who is the owner of a program in Providence called the Red Shed Bicycle Program. Donny had the skills and parts to help Chris with the repairs. With their forces combined they started getting those bikes ready to ride! 

Their efforts paid off in a big way because next month Chris will be donating about 70 bikes to The Boys and Girls Club of East Providence, according to the news site. He will also be donating 60 brand-new helmets and 100 water bottles for the kids who get bicycles. Now 70 less kids will have to experience a childhood without a bike. Shoutout to Chris and Donny with the assist for making a lot of kids very happy! 

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LOOK: Here are the 50 best beach towns in America

Every beach town has its share of pluses and minuses, which got us thinking about what makes a beach town the best one to live in. To find out, Stacker consulted data from WalletHub, released June 17, 2020, that compares U.S. beach towns. Ratings are based on six categories: affordability, weather, safety, economy, education and health, and quality of life. The cities ranged in population from 10,000 to 150,000, but they had to have at least one local beach listed on TripAdvisor. Read the full methodology here. From those rankings, we selected the top 50. Readers who live in California and Florida will be unsurprised to learn that many of towns featured here are in one of those two states.

Keep reading to see if your favorite beach town made the cut.